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about the rest of us? and there is a lot bween ron paul and dennis kucinich. what about the rest of us? my view is that i do not want to be involved in endless wars anymore thanhey do, but i do insist that we win wars we cannot afford to lose. now, the left and some of our libertarian friends believe we cannot afford this war and they e ready to leave. what happens if we leave and does it really matter? all of you are smart. you can aner that question probably better than i can. i can tell you what i think and that is probably why you came. if we lose i afghanistan, whatever that may be, it will matter. and what is losing? i think losing would be allowing the taliban to come back in power in portions or all of the country. i have one simple thought -- the taliban running anything is not a good idea. particularly i you happen to be a young woman and you believe in religious freedom and tolerance. but what does it really matter? their places -- there are places on the planet where women are treated horribly and we do not have one troop. so this is not just about righting wrongs that may
angeles daily news." that is all for the program, thank you for joining us. we will now go to the senate homeland security and government affairs committee where chairman lieberman is going to be hosting a meeting about the ongoing threats. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> i was struck yesterday by reading a gallup poll in one of the newspapers that showed a significant decrease in concern about terrorism among the american people. now, this is understandable, particularly because of the stress that current economic conditions have put so many american families under, but as the three witnesses know very well, the threat is still all too real. our committee knows that as well. it's our job and yours to be focused on protecting our homeland and our people from violent extremist and terrorists no matter what the state of public opinion is about it at the moment, and that's why, of course, we are so happy that -- and grateful that you are here today. the tragedy of 9/11 is a daily reality for the three of y
tax cuts and the expiration possibilities, obama and the democrats like to use the $250,000 figure. that is insane they will not raise taxes on the middle class. republicans -- that is saying they will not raising region be raising taxes on the middle class. republicans may find it expedient to allow them to expire so they can point fingers at the democrats during an election year. is it possible you may want to accept the $250,000 level rather than risk that all the tax cuts would expire? >> our opposition has always been pretty firm, and that we support an extension of all the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. we believe in an economy as weak as the one we are living in right now that raising taxes on any individuals, and certainly on individuals that spend significant amounts of money as well as businesses that are successful and in a greater position to hire and expand output, we believe that is not something that should be done. when it gets into which ones we would or would not accept, i am not going to sit here and negotiate with myself and public saying we will open the bidding at a
this together on such short notice. for those of us who are jews, , some jewish we know what it is like when people have attacked us verbally, attacked us physically and others remained silent. it tcjhhn>'n, americaw"# in 2010 without the response of the religious community. we speak out because we know that hate crimes and hate speech are not mere acts of disreputableiv! assaults or arsons or derivative their attacks on the pillars of the public and the guarantors of our freedom. betrayalo >> what an honor and privilege is for me having stood on the mall for years ago under similar circumstances where we were talking about liberty and justice for all. the statement that we have worked together collectively reads the sleeve. religious leaders denounced anti- muslim bigotry, call for america's respect for tradition a religious liberty. as religious leaders in this great country we have come together in our nation's capital to denounce categorically the derision, misinformation, and outright bigotry being directed against america's muslim community. we bear a sacred responsibility to honor ame
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
police procedures and what not that would be used in any crime scene were used in connection with this event. mike does mention the excellent work that the fbi did piecing together the puzzle that led to the identification of the terrorists within a short period of time. however, the preventive side of it definitely became more of a military exercise. even in that regard, the fbi and department of justice had central roles to play to develop a strategy that could be implemented to look at our borders. >> there had been a number of terrorist attacks. there were the embassies in east africa. the first world trade center attack. you could even go back to the u.s. marine barracks bombing in beirut in 1983. in every case with the united states government did principally was to send out the fbi to try to find people you could identify as perpetrators so that they could be captured and prosecuted. what you hear from all of the discussion and is very important for people to focus on is that this was a different case. this was not about going out to find people who did it to punish th
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
the u.s. has blundrd into the scenario with one overreaction or another. bin laden needs to be the object of our hoss tilts, national security and contempt and deserves to be taken seriously. but most of what he has achieved we do ourselves. bin laden does not deserve that we even inadvertently fuffleful unimagined dreams. here's more from the president friday at this news conference. i think in this day and age there is always going to be the potential for an individual or a small group of individuals, if they are willing to die, to kill other people. some of them are going to be very well organized and some of them are going to be random. that threat is there and it's important, i think, for the american people to understand that and not to live in fear. it's just a reality of today's world that there are going to be threats out there. we have i think greatly improved our homeland security security since 9/11 occurred. you know, i am constantly impressed with the dedication that our teams apply to this problem. they are chasing down every threat, not just from al qaeda
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
recent recession that demonstrates the u.s. is very strong in its reaction to the cheonan incident. they joined at the very beginning in the rescue operations, and also, [unintelligible] -- the were in strong support of the u.s. administration. this is the largest area ever conducted in the caribbean peninsula. -- kirby and peninsula. i might say that this is the reincarnation of the incident that happened between 1977 and 1993. it was a deterrent to north korean leadership and rain that in north korean policies -- north korean policies. one side effect of this is china's reaction. when we conducted this exercise in the wake of the cheonan sinking, the chinese reaction was unusually harsh. i think it has awakened at the international community. it is central in the war, as reflected in the sense of china. china had some objection to this joint exercise. for example, july 15 -- "we formally oppose any foreign militaries placed in the yellow city, undermining china's security." and second also, this was a joint week emphasized by a high- ranking military -- this was a jointly emphasi
religion within america is part of an exclusive club. this exploitation of the truth that is used for political purposes since this is now an election year, and the fact is, most americans are the easiest targets. they are an easy punching bag. we do not have the reach. we do not have a lobby. we do not have a p r infrastructure. the other side obviously has the microphone. my mentor always said something that is very telling for us as muslims as well as for americans and people. the world is not divided into muslims, christians, and jews. the world is divided into stupid people and intelligent people. >> on that note, who wants to be the first u.s. question? [laughter] raise your hand and we will have the gentleman with the microphone, for. >> we've discussed this in the past. while we know that the great majority of muslims embrace and endorse the founding principles of the united states and want to be good americans, unfortunately there are people who do not. they profess to be acting in the name of islam. one of the difficulties it seems to me is that there's no central author
security. u.s. troops pulled out last summer. iraqi forces had moved into the lead with considerable skill and commitment to their fellow citizens. even as they continue to suffer terrorist attacks, security infancies have been near the lowest on record since the war began. iraqi forces had taken the fight to al qaeda. this year sell iraq called incredible elections i drew a strong turnout. a caretaker administration is in place. tonight i encourage the leaders to move forward with a sense of urgency in coming to form a government that is just representative and accountable to the iraqi people. there should be no doubt that the people will have a strong partner in the united states. going forward, and the transitional force of u.s. troops will remain in iraq with a different mission. they will support iraqi troops in targeted counter-terrorism missions and protecting our civilians. a consistent with our agreement with the government come on u.s. troops will leave by the end of next year as our military draws down, are dedicated civilians are moving into the lead to support iraq as a result
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
the vice-president for foreign and defense policy studies. thanks a for joining us today. we are very proud to have senator lindsey graham here today. he will give a short talk this morning or this afternoon which will be followed by a session of "q&a" with the audience. after that, we will do a short and sweet roundtable, something we have not done in the past. no set piece presentations. i am pleased that we are able to have senator graham ought back here. he has really given it back one of the most interesting and well received talks here in many years last time he spoke. he has a very illustrious resume which is online at for you to read and its full form. he served for 6.5 years as an active duty air force lawyer. after leaving the air force in 1989, he joined the south carolina air national guard where he served until his election to the house of representatives in 1994. he serves as the south carolina state in the house of representatives since 2003. he was called to active duty in the first gulf war. he continues to serve in the reserves. he recently returned from reserve duty in af
-- the department of defense leaders, not by the service chiefs, a process that was supposed to inform us with one that merely ratifies a politically-driven decision. we all fall or to hearing your thoughts about whether the comprehensive review should be allowed to run its course in this fashion, and what you feel about the affected could have on the united states marine corps. we also look forward to hearing your professional military advice about what policy is best for your branch of our armed services, the effectiveness and readiness of which you will be entrusted with maintaining at the highest levels if confirmed in this position. today our military continues to be engaged in combat operations, and career officers, in ceo's, and their families, are being asked to do so much. it would be a mistake to ignore the views of our troops and the military advice of the service chiefs, and for the senate to act prematurely to repeal the tariff don't ask, don't tell law for the sake of fulfilling a political promise. i look for to the testimony of general amos today, and i again thank him and his fami
. that is the measuring stick bayous. -- measuring stick i use. the second is, do they agree to term limits? i think the number one problem we have is the desire to be there forever, and that tells me it is about them and not us. term limits is a wonderful measuring stick to judge. offer a piece of paper that says, i pledge, and make them sign it. if they do sign it, they have at least one piece of paper in the future. you're not going to get term limits passed by the u.s. congress. it is not fair to generalize it, but there are exceptions. democrat and republican, so this is not partisan statements, but the fact is, too often it is about what is best for the next election and not the next generation. we are hurting america. >> newt gingrich would not make a good nominee for president because he could not make a commitment. are there other examples? >> newt gingrich's one of the smartest man i have ever met. i have served under him four -- four years in the house. i think you can make judgments about the character based on what they're alive says. -- what the alive says. >> -- the life says. when i
asked them to send out messages to the world about the horror of the use of nuclear weapons. only those with firsthand experience can convey this. japan will coordinate with other countries and civil society to promote education on disarmament and non-proliferation issues. last december, demand -- japan's amended renewed determination toward the total elimination of nuclear weapons which was adopted in the general assembly with the united states as a co- sponsor for the first time. japan is determined to continue its efforts to strengthen the trend of broadening support for the resolution in the international community. steady implementation of the agreement of the conference in may is essential. japan and australia have coasted foreign ministers meeting on nuclear disarmament and non-poor operation on the opening of a new general assembly session. we have launched a new group dedicated to working toward a world without nuclear weapons. we intend to deep in discussions on reducing the role and a number of nuclear weapons and the world. -- in the world. i must make reference to the democ
for bringing us all together to talk about these very important issues. i have been asked to talk about racial profiling in the context of emigrants. there have been many waves of american history in which there have been anti-democrat laws and policies, but that the federal and state and city level. starting about five years ago, there has been a more recent wave, and states and cities across the country started proposing and enacting laws that were essentially designed to make life very hard for emigrants and to try to drive them out. in the last five years the state legislators have enacted reject proposed thousands of anti- immigrant laws. -- who have proposed thousands of anti-democrat loss. one of those mentioned here was the pennsylvania law, which is a law that prohibited undocumented immigrants from granting and restricted employment as well. there have been similar laws all across the country in places like farmers branch, texas. riverside, new jersey. in arizona, which is a very active state in this regard, is not the first and will not be the last. several years ago arizona passed
others to move with us. a little background. the threat. it is changing. since the end of the cold war, while the chances of an all-out global nuclear war have declined significantly, thank god, i think the chances of a nuclear strike have increased. during the cold war, the american, nato, and soviet military's were diligent and professional in the way we handle our nuclear-weapons. but we were also very lucky. we had several near misses, including but not limited to the cuban missile crisis. if we think that our luck will hold out with nine nuclear states and growing, plus the spread of technology to enrich the new clear -- and rich uranium, i think the world must think i knew. nine countries have nuclear weapons now. more are seeking them. terrorists are seeking nuclear weapons and nuclear. -- and i have no doubt that certain groups would use them if they had them. the know-how and capability to build a nuclear weapon is widely available, something we thought would only be the province of nations years ago. but it has changed. with the goal of nuclear power, and we will be talking a
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
funding for autism treatment in 12 years; student loan assistance for u.s. troops called to active duty; support for troops who come home with ptsd; more help and more contracts for pennsylvania's small businesses. [applause] he has been doing the work. in washington, you know, they make the distinction between show horses and work horses. and joe is a work horse. [applause] he's been working, not talking. [applause] and this is somebody who's been pragmatic. he will work with democrats, he'll work with republicans, he'll work with independents. he's willing to work with anybody who's interested in actually getting the job done, and that's the kind of person you want representing you in washington. that's who joe sestak is. [applause] that's why you need to work for him to make him your next senator. [applause] on the other side, we've got a candidate who was in washington for years, ran a special interest group whose main function has been to pull the republican party to the right -- even farther to the right. [laughter] i guess you could say they've done a good job -- [laughter] -- at
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
spurred that the national and local level the u.s. will lose. what do you think? the numbers to call -- you can also e-mail us. and we are on twitter. "curb corruption or lose the war" from "the wall street journal." the author of "why vietnam matters. " he draws on his own experience in vietnam. he starts out by saying -- so, what do you think? curb corruption or losing the war? will that be putting the american effort in jeopardy in afghanistan? "the wall street journal" has this piece. the piece says -- our question for you this morning, is there a danger in the u.s. losing the war in afghanistan do to problems of corruption, and bought more perhaps by the cia, trying to do the right thing and aligning itself with informants, but did they take advantage of the system? "the washington post" has an excerpt modified from "obama's wars." uc and in this year, president obama visiting arlington national -- you see in this here, president obama visiting arlington national cemetery. the peace in "the washington post" says -- so, we are seeing a little bit of the behind-the-scenes give- an
in place at 45 airports nationwide, and we intend to use recovery act funds to purchase even more machines and deploy them in the coming months. . . let me say, again, we are now through a secure flight, we have accomplished the cutover, so we are measuring the manifest against the watch list, and we're doing so for all domestic carriers. we will also be working with international carriers and hope to complete their cutover by the end of the year. this will lead to more thorough and timely watch list checks, and less of the miss identifications that sometimes cause unnecessary inconvenience for travelers and undue media attention. finally, we have begun screening 100% of the air cargo of domestic flights on passenger planes, as required by 9/11 act. this is a goal that we have been working towards. i know alpa has been working closely with the tsa on these requirements. we will continue to work with you to make sure that this program is as effective as possible and its implementation continues to go smoothly. so as i said at the beginning of my remarks, you remain one of the most vital par
drag us back to 1970. >> i inkjected -- i injected history into our discussion early on. i have to at least note the two-state solution that is been part of the diplomacy in this conflict since 1937. we're now going on 73 years, and the chances that the two-state solution, in my view, is going to disappear from the lexicon in this conflict any time soon are fairly soon. with that, ladies and gentlemen, let me thank all my panelists for participating in today's event and thank all of you and all of you out in for -- out there for joining us in our discussion. [applause] >> thank you. >> search the term "mid east peace" on line at the c-span library and you will get more than ,000 transcripts including an early mike wallace interview of abba eban. it is washington and the world your way. >> president obama's address to the nation last night in about a half-hour. before that, house minority leader john boehner's speech on troop withdrawals. >> vice president joe biden will attend an exchange in military command ceremony on c-span2. after that, the financial inquigs begins a series
, a look at the u.s. foster care system. daniel heimpel joins us. this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] host: good morning, and welcome to "washington journal" for wednesday, september 27, 2010. president obama travels to new york for the u.n. general assembly. he will talk health care reform at a back yard reception in virginia s and meet with insurance commissioners and this evening, a democratic fund- raiser. the house returns to washington for a few days of business and the senate continues work. yesterday it did not move for the defense authorization bill and overturning "don't ask, don't tell." a ban on gays openly serving in the military. top story today, a new book by bob woodward about inside the white house. but with the president and his top military advisers and recounts a tough decision on whether to build up true spirit that is our topic this morning. you can give us a call and way and -- we are also on line. and you can find us on twitter. the top story and "the washington
.m. eastern. at c-span.org, you can find an archive of past "prime minister's questions." >> monday, the u.s. senate impeachment trial begins its hearings for the prosecution of a u.s. district court judge who is trying -- charged with accepting gifts from those who had cases before him. it is expected to last throughout the week. this starts at 80 a eastern on c-span2. >> monday, a discussion about ending world hunger, an economist and ordained minister, who was named a warrant -- world food prize laureate. watch the coverage on c-span. >> the c-span networks. we provide coverage of nonfiction books, public affairs, in history. it is all available on television, radio, online and social networking sites, and find our content any time on the c-span video library, and we take c-span on the road with our mobile content vehicle, bringing our resources to you. the c-span networks, now available in 100 million homes, created by cable, provided as a public service. >> now, the first colorado senate debate between michael bennett and republican challenger. they answered questions on the federal hea
this is a letter we got from maxim u.s. we're federal services. experts on appeals. medicare hired us to review this file and decide if the partd plan made the correct decision. we work for medicare. we do not work for part-d plan. we appealed and my wife won wholly. so the administrative law judge process. maxim u.s. has appealed that a decision and they say according to the term medically accepted indication includes only fda uses and those off dated uses supported by citation on one of the listed drugs. more over, medically accepted indication does not including treating physician testimony or proffer of medical efforts showing a drug as prescribed effectively treats the condition for which it's being used. converse easily could have included expert testimony as a source material for determining medically accepted uses if he wanted to do so. instead congress by reference to a drugs fda label and expert opinions in one of several drug. accordingly. medical accept the use is not the same as medically necessary. >> i would like to, we worked on issues like that so. we could be of help to you.
enables us to represent our interests throughout the world is a principle we should uphold. can i put it to you that you have mentioned this in your answer before. is it true, and i take this from your written response to our questions, that you are referring to the viewing the scoring methodology to ensure this work is fully captured inconsistent with the guidelines for scoring. that means you're looking at things that have in the past been paid for by the budget. tacom>> there is a quite a propn that is categorized as overseas development. in the last year 137 billion pounds. >> a you will have to wait for the results of the comprehensive spending because you are trying to anticipate and trying to anticipate this. we will have to wait for those things. that spending can be provided for as a very different budget. the important thing is it is compliant. as we look at the country by 2013, we are all strongly agreeing on the gross national and come. it's important to recognize what contributes to that. that is oversees development spending. takeov>> spending will be used o fund things
their jobs. and today, mr. chairman, they are seeing us stand up for the american manufacturing and american workers and demand a level playing field and an end to china's currency manipulation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. brady: i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from michigan. mr. levin: mr. speaker, it's now my pleasure, a deep privilege to yield a minute to our distinguished speaker, nancy pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized. the speaker: thank you, mr. speaker. i thank you for the recognition and of yielding of time from the distinguished chairman of the ways and means committee. w and means committee. i think him for bringing this legislation to the floor and i thank mr. murphy -- bipartisan murphys for their leadership in this important legislation. mr. speaker, for so many years, we have watched china-u.s. trade deficit grow and grow and grow. and today, we are finally doing something about it by recognizing that china's manipulation of the currency
city bombing was about half a ton of explosions. nuclear weapons, the unit used is thousands of tons. it takes about 25 truck loads, semitrucks. there have been megaton weapons as well. think about something completely different. do not think in terms of just another explosion. the original five nuclear club was formed. it become clear they were the ones that would control the intent around the world. what if that hadn't happened or suppose we didn't understand all the things we did about notify indication. we maloufed it was possible to make explosions. that took a lost effort to do. what if it had not happened? >> it is a great sport for people not involved in relay history. if discovery hadn't been made, what would the world have been capable of doing without that? my wife hates it because i watch the history channel. there were eight wars by the time i was in middle school. eight strategic wars and vietnam for us. we new world war i left about 20 million people dead. without nuclear weapons, what is the world tapeable of doing in terms of conventional arment. think about world wa
the expectations of the people who will use our products. >> on august 19, an online article suggested that mcdonnell had exceptional quality control measures until 2002, the year if you assumed the position of chairman and chief executive officer. the article suggested that cost- cutting had a significant impact on the quality control standards and procedures across the company. are you familiar with that article? >> yes, sir. >> further, the article is critical of your ability to manage the consumer products business we are discussing today. is it possible at cost cutting contributed to the culture that created the quality issues? >> i did not believe that cost cutting contributed to this. >> do you think that's the cost cutting culture may have inadvertently created a situation in which santa recalls and processes that did not put consumer safety first could occur? >> no, sir. could i elaborate on that. >> while we have five minutes, but i do want you to answer. >> i do not believe that cost cutting nor financials were put ahead of the quality for patients at any of our facilities.
that were bestowed on us through our constitution and with the grace of almighty god. we're endowed by our creator with certain inalienable rights. apparently the president left out the creator, it's understand -- understandable, when you rely as heavily on teleprompters as our president does, it's understandable that sometimes you read past things. and certainly the person who fills in his teleprompter with the information would not have left that important part of the declaration of independence out, we're endowed by our creator, because if it were otherwise, if we were endowed by the government with inalienable right, then the government could take them away any time they wished.1 any time they wished. but when you go back to the founding of this country to the time when those people gathered together and gave us the foundation of what we've grown from and grown into this fantastic republic, the greatest coubt country in the history of the world, as tony blair recently said and as another member of parliament saying this week, this is an extraordinary country, like no other in history.
alinsky." thank you very much for joining us. >> thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> tonight on prime minister's questions, deputy prime minister nick clegg stands in former prime minister david cameron. engines questions on government loans and unemployment benefits. after that, we turn to u.s. politics and a new hampshire wrote republican senate primary debate. then, a discussion on the latest underemployment rates. on "q&a," an interview of nicholas von hoffman. >> monday, the u.s. senate impeachment trial hearing begins for the prosecution of u.s. district court judge thomas porteous. proceedings will last year out the week. watch live proceedings starting at 8:00 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> monday, a discussion about ending world hunger with reverend david beckham, named a world food prize laureate in june. >> the bottom line is that we need our borders secured. we cannot afford illegal immigration. >> it does hurt us. it has heard arizonas economist -- economy severely. >> with the midterm el
for americans, and find enough support in this body and the congress. it is very important to us, as a country, that we do not leave those markets to our competitors. >> it would be your opinion that the ratification of those agreements would create jobs? >> we have to make sure that we have agreements in place that provide a good deal for american businesses and american workers. where we have strong agreements that meet that test, it will be important for us to make them law. >> with the basel discussion on the capital standards, i want to ask about capital formation. the financial reform bill changed the net worth test for meeting the accredited investors standard. did you support those changes, believing that altering the standards will impact the ability to raise capital and take companies public? >> you are testing my memory of the origin of that provision. i would be happy to look at it in more detail and come back to you. my general view, and i think it is supported by how the broader investment community reacted, is that this will provide a better system for companies to go raise capi
with corporations, lobbyists, or anything. it has to do with us. last year i had a chance to go to iraq. i have been there three times and afghanistan twice. i met with a group of people they voted in iraq for the very first time. they stood in line risking their lives for the right to vote in the election. you know what? if the people of orange beach and gulf shores had to stand in the three-mile long bond to vote, it would not be 24%, it might not even before%. -- the 4%. no one controls your government when the american people take their government back. the best way to do that is to be active. i would give anything -- let's take this coming election, november 2, drive around the streets of orange beach. see how many people have a yard sign in their yard. have a bumper sticker on their car. wear a button to the grocery store. that with all due respect is the best way to keep america on the track we want it to go on. it is not just to say to limit this -- and i agree with you. we need to limit outside influence especially if it is not being reported. but the better ways to make sure that the peopl
have to give us adequate time to get to the floor so we can respond to the bills and i am recognized and am making a statement because i'm really upset. this is the way the majority has been running the congress, mr. speaker. . you wonder why the american people are upset with majority is because of this. if you don't give adequate notice to the ranking member to be to the floor on bills, people are going to know. you know they are going to know? because i'm going to tell the story. rules matter around this place. now, let me go back to the first bill. the only reason i want to mention this is because i want to thank, you just passed it, we are going to do it by voice, let me tell you what's upsetting. it's the parliamentarian. from the time you drop that bill and the parliamentarian makes sure it gets to the jurisdictions. some might get amended and some other committee thinks they want a view on it. what happens is the majority not giving a doggone about the minority puts bills on this floor no matter what they do so long it's in comfort with someone else. they don't care about the
very much for joining us. >> thank you. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> for a dvd copy of this program, call 1-877-662-7726. for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at q-and- a.org. "q&a" programs are also available as podcasts. >> next on "prime minister's questions," dip the prime minister -- deputy prime minister nick clegg stands in for david cameron. following that, a colorado senate debate. tomorrow on "washington journal," a look at what congress plans to do before the november 2 election with david hawkings from cq. then, colin kahl and michelle mello. that is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> but, honestly, i am not going to take this from a party, from a party, that has spent all of its time in office backbiting against each other through leaks to the press, a party of the dossier of damion mcbride. a little bit of consistency on this, shall we? >> now, from london, "prime minister's questions" from the british house of commons. ministers
freedom, and at least 12 of these nations are allowing open service and are currently fighting alongside u.s. troops in afghanistan. there's a cost involved in our current policy. according to a 2005 g.a.o. report, american taxpayers spend more than $30 million each year to train replacement for gay troops discharged under the don't ask, don't policy. the total costs reported since the statute was implemented, according to g.a.o., has been nearly $200 million and that doesn't count the administrative and legal costs associated with investigations and hearings. the military schooling of gay troops, such as pilot training and linguist training. we are losing highly-skilled troops to this policy. according to the g.a.o., 8% of the service members let go under don't ask, don't tell held critical occupations defined as services such as interpreters, 3% had skills in an important foreign language such as arabic, farsi or korean. more than 13,000 troops have been dismissed from the military simply because of their sexual orientation since president clton signed this law in 1993. mr. president, soci
speaking i would appreciate it. tell us your name and any ebullitions you might have. please wait. we have microphones coming around to you. >> thank you. i am mike billington. i do not know if you went to the conference in quantico last week, but at that conference are raise the exact question you have drawn, the elite of the chinese and russians and others that the evidence is an adequate. the response from different generals as we do not need no stinking evidence. [laughter] look at the provocations, it isn't their character, therefore we have to accept this is true. you did not mention the issue, which has concerned me about this, which is why in this area of very high south korean and u.s. and nato anti-submarine warfare facilities and sonar equipment and so forth there appears to have been no son are evidence whatsoever -- no sonar evidence whatsoever? we all know that north korea said they had nothing to do with this, but i am wondering what you did north korea thinks about this. in other words, who could have done it, who in the west? is that the british? whaty is the view of the n
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
for bankruptcy. and like many of us, in that case, and certainly most of the people in bankruptcy, the porteous were shown to be horrible recordkeepers. and obvious a bad money managers. that's a fairly common trait, by the way, when people declare bankruptcy. they tend to have problems with records in money management. during these discussions, mr. lightfoot proposed the idea that the porteous' file their original bankruptcy petition under the pseudonym or various. let me repeat that. mr. lightfoot proposed that they filed under that name. he has presented testified to that effect. he said it was his idea to avoid embarrassment for the porteous', and for their children. because they didn't want it plastered all over the times they team. the newspaper in 2001 publish weekly names of everyone who sought bankruptcy protection and she was particularly embarrassed by that type of publicity for the family. while most bankrupt defilers enjoy anonymity through this process, and while so many cases, public figures were and are singled out other bankruptcy filings. as public figures yourself, i'm sure y
. to us your thoughts about a story line of 1994 versus -- give us your thoughts on the story line of 1994 versus 20103 how can democrats governor's mitigate what many are talking about as a wave election? >> first of all, it is a different year, by definition -- i will start with that fact. there are clearly parallels to 1994, and i think there are pretty serious the distinctions. it seems that the series distinctions are that we democrats were asleep at the switch in 1994. we were complacent, we or smog, and to put it bluntly -- we were smug, and to put it bluntly, we were again. that is not the case today. we have been on red alert for a long, long time. no. 2 is that the republicans were identified in 1994. you mentioned this. they were unified in 1994. people forget the contract with -- some of us call it the contract on america. dee dee and i were talking about that. the white house was pretty smug about that. "no one is going to listen to that." newt gingrich, think of him what you may, and we have a lot of him -- he had atampa - lot of thoughts. the tea party has a downside for us
comfortable i think that will go a long way to helping us get out of what we are in. host: the twitter community on our website page which is c-span wj are talking about your background and the fact that you were a chief risk officer for several of these companies that were in trouble. guest: i was also a regulator. host: they are wondering -- and i am, too, you implied you didn't stay at some of them because of the risk the companies were taking. can you sort of speak in general about what kind of conversations you or some others that you know, your colleagues, might have had with executives and what kind of push-back you got? guest: that is a delicate situation for me because there is litigation going on so i can't speak to too many specifics. but i will come back and say i wrote a study on this back in the spring on risk management practices during the motor crisis and i believe the following from what i observed and it didn't matter what kind of institution it was, bank, thrift or whatever it was. or even the people there. these institutions, before the crisis, were very sales orie
for the evening are here with us. let's get to it. josh, first question. mr. binnie, first response. >> we're here to talk about the issues. the tone of this race has become an issue. a lot of people say it has been one of the nastiest primary races in recent memory in new hampshire. where do you draw the line between an honest critique -- of their critique of your opponents background and nasty campaigning? >> it is a pleasure to be here tonight. it has been my pleasure to run for the united states senate. the people of new hampshire have gotten to know me. my dad introduced me over nine months ago. folks understand that i care about the job and the economy. when i became the frontrunner in the august, we were attacked by all kinds of private organizations. i thought that was not fair. i did not like it. not for amnesty. i am a liberal. ask my kids. what i am about is talking and dealing with the economic crisis that new hampshire is experiencing. we need jobs in our state. that is what i want to talk about. they do not care about these ads. they want to hear our policies and our background and h
for afghanistan. whenever you do a strategic plan, used her with a list of planning assumptions. if any of the internet to be wrong -- when every do a strategic plan, you start out with a list of planning assumptions. if any of them turn out to be wrong, then you have a problem. they looked at the afghan presidential election and started rethinking whether or not we had a credible partner that we could work with, by, and threw in afghanistan. if you look at the way we americans look at counterinsurgency, we are a lot from the british and different experiences of the 20th-century. -- the british and french experiences of the 20th-century. the british and northern -- the british in northern ireland, they thought they were in their own turf. by the same token, the french in algeria, the french considered algeria part of metropolitan france. it was non-negotiable. when the conflict began, algeria was a part of france. that was not from the perspective of the fln. that informed the way they thought about the conflict. you kind of assume that your interests will line up with the host governme
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